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BSysE 512 – Poster Competition Awards

On behalf of Dr. Wu and Dr. Tang, we would like to congratulate the winners of the BSysE 512 – Poster Competition.

1st Place: Yaqoob Majeed – “Mechanical/Automatic Solution for Labor Intensive Branch Training in Trellis Trained Apple Trees”

2nd Place: Momtanu Chakraborty – “Evaluation of Vineyard Growth Using NIR and Thermal Images under Different Irrigation Treatments”

3rd Place: Santosh Bhusal – “Bird Deterrence in Fruit Crops Using Unmanned Aerial Systems(UAS)” and Evan Terrell – “Primary Reactions in Pyrolysis of Milled Wood Lignin: The Effect of Vacuum on Product Distributions”

Honorable Mentions: Kapil Khanal – “Red Raspberry Cane Identification Using Spectral Signature” and Lin Chen – “A Prototype of Leveling System for Weeding Robot”

WSU Research Gets Closer to Cost-Effective BioFuels

June 5, 2017 | ENVIRONMENTAL MOLECULAR SCIENCES LABORATORY  [ full article ]

June 6, 2017 | PHYS.ORG [ full article ]

Molecular-level understanding of cellulose structure reveals why it resists degradation and could lead to cost-effective biofuels.

A major bottleneck hindering cost-effective production of biofuels and many valuable chemicals is the difficulty of breaking down cellulose—an important structural component of plant cell walls. A recent study addressed this problem by characterizing molecular features that make cellulose resistant to degradation.

 

 

WSU Tri-Cities team earns CleanTech Big Picture prize at UW business competition

May 26, 2017 | by Maegan Murray

WSU Tri-Cities Lignin Biotech team

RICHLAND, Wash. – A team from Washington State University Tri-Cities took home the Wells Fargo “CleanTech” Big Picture prize during the University of Washington’s Business Plan Competition this week.

With the award, the team, which includes Libing Zhang, a recent doctoral alumna, and Manuel Seubert and Taylor Pate, who are master’s in business administration students, was presented with a $5,000 check.

“We believe that we performed very well,” Zhang said. “We received extremely positive feedback regarding our business plan and presentation. Each team had a great product and were very convincing. We felt fortunate to be a part of it all.”

[ full article ]

WSU Tri-Cities team in UW business competition ‘sweet 16’

April 28, 2017   |  WSU News

RICHLAND, Wash. – A team from Washington State University Tri-Cities whose business plan is to commercialize a WSU-patented jet fuel technology has advanced to the University of Washington Business Plan Competition’s “sweet 16” round.

The sweet 16 round of the UW Business Plan Competition kicks off May 25.

full article on WSU News ]

 

New model forecasts grapevine bud break, bloom and veraison

May 7, 2017  |  Good Fruit Grower  |  Kate Prengaman

An AgWeatherNet anemometer spins from wind above a young Merlot planting northeast of Royal City, Washington, collecting data that will help predict key stages in phenological development through a new model now available to growers. <b>(TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower)</b>When will your Cabernet Sauvignon reach bud break? And when should you expect your Riesling to bloom?

Every season is a little different, but Washington State University’s AgWeatherNet is now tracking what this spring’s weather means for your vines.

[Continue Reading on Good Fruit Grower]

 

 

See the full story on Good Fruit Grower

Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge

April 3, 2017  |  WSU News

Manuel Seubert, master’s of business administration student, and Libing Zhang, postdoctoral researcher standing at table with presentation postersRICHLAND, Wash. – Washington State University Tri-Cities technology and a business plan for converting the plant material lignin into biojet fuel won third place among 21 teams at the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge finals last week.

The team of Libing Zhang, postdoctoral researcher, and Manuel Seubert, master’s of business administration student, worked regularly with researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare for the competition. They won the Starbucks $5,000 prize.

[ full article at WSU News ]

New way to characterize cellulose, advance bioproducts

MARCH 23, 2017  |  by Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University Tri-Cities and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found a new way to define the molecular structure of cellulose, which could lead to cheaper and more efficient ways to make a variety of crucial bioproducts.

For the first time, researchers revealed the differences between the surface layers and the crystalline core of cellulose by combining spectroscopy processes that use infrared and visible laser beams to analyze the structure of molecular components. The findings appear this month in Scientific Reports, an online open-access journal produced by the Nature Publishing Group (http://www.nature.com/articles/srep44319).

[ full article at WSU News ]

Predicting Phenology: A New Tool from AgWeatherNet

Spring 2017  |  Viticulture and Enology Extension News

Phenology refers to “the science of appearance”. This translates into understanding nature’s “calendar” of plant development. Important phenological events in viticulture include bud break, bloom and veraison, which are tied closely with management practices. Predicting when these events will occur can be difficult; most key phenological stages of grape are sensitive to climate and seasonal weather. Seasonal changes can include variations in day length, temperature, and precipitation. Adding to the challenge is that spring phenological events are occurring earlier and fall events are happening later than they have in the past as a result of  climate variability. [Continue reading on Viticulture and Enology Extension News]

 

Story continues on the Viticulture and Enology Extension News

Washington State Professor Finds Sky-high Opportunities for Drones in Agriculture

February 27, 2017  |  Washington Farm Bureau

Many farmers and ranchers are already benefitting from drone technology, but the work of researchers like Dr. Lav Khot is showing that we’ve only scratched the surface of what this relatively new technology can do for agriculture. Khot works for Washington State University’s Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems and in the agricultural automation engineering research emphasis area of the Department of Biological Systems Engineering. [ full article on Farm Bureau site ]

Washington State University