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Commencement May 2018

Commencement May 2018

Pictured from left:

Poonam Bajaj, Ph.D.; Armando Quintanilla Perez Lete, Ph.D.; Shyam Sablani, Ph.D., Associate Professor; Momtanu Chakraborty, M.S.; Afef Marzougui, M.S.; Carlos Zuniga, Ph.D.; Sindhuja Sankaran, Ph.D., Assistant Professor; Kapil Khanal, M.S.; Abirami Rajendran, M.S.; Seyedehsanaz Jarolmasjed, Ph.D.

Chongyuan Zhang receives 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence

April 19, 2018Chongyuan Zhang & Dr. Sindhuja Sankaran with award

Chongyuan Zhang, a Graduate Assistant in Sindhuja Sankaran’s group received the 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence at the 2018 WSU Graduate Student Evening of Excellence.

Congratulations to Chongyuan and Dr. Sankaran for this accomplishment!

More photos of the event can be found on the Event Photo Website

 

WSU precision agriculture program ranked in top 25 in world

April 13, 2018  |  By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Industry professionals have named Washington State University one of the 25 best colleges in the world for precision agriculture.

At WSU, the Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems (CPAAS) http://cpaas.wsu.edu and the Agricultural Technology and Production Management (AgTM, http://afs.wsu.edu/majors/ag-technology-and-production-management/) academic program are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing agriculture today ― labor.

[ Read full article in the WSU News ]

WSU researchers develop material that could save honey bees

April 10, 2018 KREM 2, by Luke Morand

Researchers have developed a new material that attracts pesticide residue in bees and, when ingested, the particles absorb the pesticide toxins.

PULLMAN, Wash. — Researchers at Washington State University have developed a new material that could help save honey bees.

It is all thanks to a microscopic particle that attracts and gets rid of pesticides, according to new research.

[ read full article at KREM.com ]


April 9, 2018 WSU Insider, by Scott Weybright

PULLMAN, Wash. – Honey bee colonies could be saved from collapse in the future thanks to a microscopic particle that attracts pesticides, as created by Washington State University researchers.

Consider this: A grain of salt weighs 58,500 nanograms. It takes only 15 nanograms of pesticide to kill a bee.

Researchers at Washington State University have developed a new material that attracts pesticide residue in bees. Over time, pollen tinged with itsy bitsy amounts of pesticides accumulates in a bee’s body, reducing the lifespan of each bee in a colony.

[ read full article at the news.wsu.edu ]

 

GPSA Award of Excellence

The Graduate & Professional Student Association (GPSA) at WSU has selected the Food Engineering Club as a recipient for a GPSA Award of Excellence for your contributions as a Registered Student Organization during the 2017-2018 academic year.

Center of Excellence for Food Safety receives $1M Grant Continuation from USDA NIFA

Dr TangDr. Juming Tang, the Principal Investigator for the Center of Excellence for Food Safety, has received a $1M grant continuation for the grant’s second year from USDA NIFA. The four year, $4M grant, aims to accelerate technology transfer of microwave based food safety technologies by leveraging resources from the government, universities, and the food industry to bridge knowledge gaps and reduce technical and regulatory hurdles for food companies, particularly small and medium sized companies. This will be done by adopting novel technologies for the production of nutritious, safe, high-quality prepackaged foods and ready-to-eat (RTE) meals in light of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

WSU Principal investigators include Juming Tang (BSE), Shyam Sablani (BSE), Carolyn Ross (SFS), and Karina Gallardo (SES)

“BeeToxx” Receives Second Place at the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge

BeeToxx won the $10,000 Herbert B. Jones Foundation second place prize at the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge, hosted by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship.The grand prize winners at the Alaska Airlines Environmental Innovation Challenge (EIC) proved to judges that gardening and innovation go together naturally. BioPots took home the $15,000 Wells Fargo prize with their biodegradable planter pots made from biomass waste like spent beer grains. The University of Washington team included three engineers from the Bioresource Science and Engineering program and a student from the Foster School of Business.

This year marked the 10th Anniversary of the EIC, hosted by the Foster School’s Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship. The competition also set a record with student teams from five different schools and universities in the Pacific Northwest taking home prizes. The $10,000 Herbert B. Jones Foundation second place prize went to BeeToxx from Washington State University. The team of Bioengineering, Biology, Communication, and Entrepreneurship students developed a carbon-based microparticle solution that protects Honey Bee colonies exposed to harmful pesticides.

[ Read full story at Foster Blog ]

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