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Getting mac and cheese to Mars

September 24, 2019  |   WSU Insider

By Scott Weybright, CAHNRS.

Washington State University scientists have developed a way to triple the shelf life of ready-to-eat macaroni and cheese, a development that could have benefits for everything from space travel to military use.

If human beings go to Mars, they need food. Food that won’t spoil during the long travel between planets, and while they’re on the surface… continue reading article…

Source: WSU Insider, September 24, 2019

Dr. Tang is a winner of IAEF Lifetime Achievement Award

August 18, 2019  |   International Congress on Engineering and Food

Dr. Juming Tang (BSE Regents Professor and Chair) is among the winners of the Life Time Achievement award from International Association for Engineering and Food (IAEF).  He will be recognized during the International Congress on Engineering and Food (ICEF13), to be held September 23-26, 2019 in Melbourne, Australia.

Congratulations to Dr. Tang!

Source: International Congress on Engineering and Food, Melbourne, Australia

Recent election to identify FED Rep/Representative-elect to the International Association for Engineering and Food (IAEF)

September 18, 2019  |   IFT Connect Daily Digest

Dr. Gustavo V. Barbosa-Canovas (BSE Professor) has been elected as new IFT FED Representative to the International Association for Engineering and Food (IAEF) for a period of four years (September 15, 2019 – Sept 14, 2023). 

Dr. Juming Tang (BSE Regents Professor and Chair) has been elected as IFT FED representative-elect to IAEF for four years (September 15, 2019 – Sept 14, 2023) followed by service as IFT FED Representative for four years (September 15, 2023 – September 14, 2027).  
Our congratulations to both of them!

Source: Press Release: IFT Connect Daily Digest

Adding Washington State to the California-Dutch AgFoodTech

August 13, 2019  |  California Dutch AgFoodTech Collaboration Update #17

The summer vacation period was in between the last newsletter in July and this one. We used this period to prepare important next steps for the project. One of these steps was adding Washington State to the initiative, Peter Frans de Jong of Wageningen University & Research and Marcel van Haren visited Washington State and California to further specify next steps in the so called collective CAWADU project for fruit orchard automation.

The first week of our visit we got to know the Washington State fruit sector very well, thanks to great help of Washington State University (WSU) and the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission. The picture is taken at the WSU extension in Prosser (WA) where Peter Frans and Marcel had the pleasure to present about Fruit 4.0, FME and AgriFoodTech Platform for a large group of students and other interested people…

Read the article: Adding Washington State to the collaboration, 2019, California Dutch AgFoodTech Collaboration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who are you going to call? Rotbusters!

August 29, 2019  |  Capital Press

SankarinIf potato farmers worry about storage losses, they might want to call “Rotbusters.”That’s the name Sindhuja Sankaran uses to explain her work using sensors to detect storage diseases like pythium and soft rot at early stages, even before their symptoms become visible.

Sankaran is an associate professor in the WSU Department of Biological Systems Engineering.

She says the sensors “smell” differences in potatoes that a disease emits. For example, a farmer might use a portable sensor to scan different areas of his potato storage. If the sensor detects a certain marker compound produced by rot or another disease, it triggers an alarm. That allows farmers to address the problem before it grows…

Read the Full Article : Western Innovator: Sensors ‘smell’ plant diseases, 2019, Capital Press

 

 

 

 

 

New global fellowship program grows discoveries, partnerships in ag research

September 3, 2019  |  CAHNRS News

Now being piloted at WSU, a 12-week fellowship program is the first of its kind to be offered through CGIAR, formerly known as the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. Sponsored by the USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service and modeled on the USDA’s well-established Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program, the new program brings early and mid-career researchers from five CGIAR centers around the globe to WSU, promoting agricultural productivity, food security, and economic growth through collaborative research.

Milton Valencia joined the lab of Sindhuja Sankaran, a Biological Systems Engineering researcher studying how sensor technology can aid plant breeding, crop research, and precision agriculture. “CGIAR Borlaug Fellowships are a starting point for international collaboration,” said Sankaran. “We’re learning from Milton, and he is learning from us.”

Prospective fellows are chosen for their research interests, achievements and potential, then recruited and matched with mentors by WSU’s Office of International Programs. Mentors later make a return visit to their fellow’s home country to help foster continuing discoveries. “Visiting fellows become part of the scientific community on campus,” said Colleen Taugher, Associate Director for Global Research & Engagement at WSU. “Through the CGIAR Fellowship program, we’ve brought some very promising scientists to WSU and are expecting strong outcomes.”

Read the Article : New global fellowship program grows discoveries, partnerships in ag research, 2019, CAHNRS News

 

 

 

 

 

WSU’s Ag Tech Day – 1:30-6:00 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 22, in Prosser, Washington.

August 13, 2019  |  WSU Insider

Experts from WSU, the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries, Microsoft FarmBeats and ASI Robots will share updates on cutting-edge agricultural advances with growers, agricultural industry professionals, and crop consultants.

This year’s event explores the theme of automation in specialty crop production, and includes field demonstrations and discussions of digital agriculture solutions, automation in farm operations, robotics in specialty crops, intelligent orchard sprayers, a survey of autonomy on the farm, and regulations on the use of autonomous vehicles in Washington farming.

Read the article : Tech Day explores automation in specialty crops, 2019, WSU Insider.

 

 

 

 

 

Precision pruning can help machines safely, efficiently harvest apples

July 9, 2019  |  WSU Insider

With more apples to pick than any other state—more than 2.5 million tons every year—Washington apple producers have a growing desire to put labor-saving machines to work at harvest.

Sharing new discoveries on how precise pruning could support a labor-saving mechanical harvesting technique, scientists at Washington State University have won an award for their research from the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE).

Read the article : Precision pruning can help machines, 2019, WSU Insider.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Hanwu Lei Featured by USDA NIFA

June 12, 2019  |   NIFA Update

A research group led by Washington State University (WSU) scientists has found a way to turn daily plastic waste products into jet fuel.

In a new paper published in the journal Applied Energy, WSU’s Hanwu Lei and colleagues melted plastic waste at high temperature with activated carbon, a processed carbon with increased surface area, to produce jet fuel.

“Waste plastic is a huge problem worldwide,” said Lei, an associate professor in WSU’s Department of Biological System Engineering.

 

Read the Article : Making a difference. NIFA Update.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic water bottles may one day fly people cross-country

June 4, 2019  |   WSU Insider

A research group led by Washington State University scientists has found a way to turn daily plastic waste products into jet fuel.

In a new paper published in the journal Applied Energy, WSU’s Hanwu Lei and colleagues melted plastic waste at high temperature with activated carbon, a processed carbon with increased surface area, to produce jet fuel.

“Waste plastic is a huge problem worldwide,” said Lei, an associate professor in WSU’s Department of Biological System Engineering. “This is a very good, and relatively simple, way to recycle these plastics.”

In the experiment, Lei and colleagues tested low-density polyethylene and mixed a variety of waste plastic products, like water bottles, milk bottles, and plastic bags, and ground them down to around three millimeters, or about the size of a grain of rice…

Read the Article : Plastic water bottles may on day fly people cross-country.  WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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