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Sindhuja Sankaran honored by CAHNRS with early career excellence award

June 21, 2022  | CAHNRS News

Sindhuja SankaranEarly Career Excellence: Sindhuja Sankaran

An associate professor in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Sankaran studies sensor technologies for crop phenotyping and supports plant breeding, crop plant research, and precision agriculture applications. Her research and teaching program supports researchers from other CAHNRS departments and USDA-ARS labs.

Sankaran was honored for her leadership, service, and outreach, for a robust and productive research program, and as a terrific teacher who receives high marks on student evaluations. Highly engaged with her students and post-docs, she is an outstanding mentor for the next generation of scientists. Sankaran strives to impress upon them the importance of following rigorous scientific methods and of communication via prompt publication and involvement in scientific societies.

… continue reading CAHNRS News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

July 29, 2021 | WSU Insider

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

With a new $20 million federal grant, Washington State University will lead a multi-institutional research institute to develop artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to tackle some of agriculture’s biggest challenges related to labor, water, weather and climate change.

The new institute is one of 11 launched by the National Science Foundation and among two funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture in 2021. It’s called the AgAID Institute, which is short for USDA-NIFA Institute for Agricultural AI for Transforming Workforce and Decision Support.

WSU Insider

Members of Biological Systems Engineering who are involved in this work include:
Claudio Stockle
Qin Zhang
Lav Khot
Manoj Karkee
R. Troy Peters
Kirti Rajagopalan
Sindhuja Sankaran

WSU summer undergraduate research featured at virtual symposia

June 21, 2021  |  WSU Insider

WSU Summer undergrad research featured at virtual symposiaPhenomics Big Data Management group led by Sindhuja Sankaran

Washington State University will feature the mentored research of nearly 60 undergraduates from 36 universities at three virtual symposia on Friday, July 30, Aug. 3, and Aug. 6. Each event runs from 10:30 a.m.-noon each day. The public is invited to the no-cost presentations.

“The students may come from institutions across the nation plus WSU, but they shared a common experience by working with WSU’s outstanding faculty researchers and their teams on a variety of important projects.  “We look forward to hearing individual students explain the work they did and the results they found during their time at WSU.”

Sindhuja Sankaran’s lab, of the Agricultural Automation Engineering section of the Biological Systems Engineering Department, provides research experience for undergraduates on Phenomics Big Data Management. Crop phenomics is a new transdisciplinary field of research that is a critical interface between plant biology, engineering, and data sciences. Phenomics data refers to sensory data acquired from high-throughput sensing/automation equipment that are associated with crop phenotypes/traits. Crop phenotyping is a complex process as the plant phenotype results from interactions between the genetic framework, dynamically changing environment, and complex plant physiology.

Student projects this Friday will be from the Sankaran, Padowski, and Offerdahl labs. A schedule posted on the summer undergraduate research website details the names of student researchers and their presentation times.

… continue reading the article, WSU Insider, 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Satellites show promise as tool for monitoring crop development

November 18, 2019  |   WSU Insider

While drones equipped with high-resolution cameras are well suited for observing plant development from far above, satellites could be the next leap ahead for farmers seeking to monitor their crops over large or scattered plots.

Sindhuja Sankaran, an associate professor in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, and her team arrived at these conclusions as a part of their paper published in Computers and Electronics in Agriculture last month.

“When breeders have multiple location trials scattered across a large area to study the genotype-environment interactions, they need to go to each plot, take measurements, and record them in order to conduct phenotyping trials,” Sankaran said. “Most of their time is spent traveling, rather than collecting data. We felt that if it was possible to use high-resolution satellite imagery to make these observations, data could be captured in a much more efficient way.” continue reading the article…

 

Read the Article : Satellites show promise as tool for monitoring crop development.  WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

Who are you going to call? Rotbusters!

August 29, 2019  |  Capital Press

SankarinIf potato farmers worry about storage losses, they might want to call “Rotbusters.”That’s the name Sindhuja Sankaran uses to explain her work using sensors to detect storage diseases like pythium and soft rot at early stages, even before their symptoms become visible.

Sankaran is an associate professor in the WSU Department of Biological Systems Engineering.

She says the sensors “smell” differences in potatoes that a disease emits. For example, a farmer might use a portable sensor to scan different areas of his potato storage. If the sensor detects a certain marker compound produced by rot or another disease, it triggers an alarm. That allows farmers to address the problem before it grows…

Read the Full Article : Western Innovator: Sensors ‘smell’ plant diseases, 2019, Capital Press

 

 

 

 

 

New global fellowship program grows discoveries, partnerships in ag research

September 3, 2019  |  CAHNRS News

Now being piloted at WSU, a 12-week fellowship program is the first of its kind to be offered through CGIAR, formerly known as the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. Sponsored by the USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service and modeled on the USDA’s well-established Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program, the new program brings early and mid-career researchers from five CGIAR centers around the globe to WSU, promoting agricultural productivity, food security, and economic growth through collaborative research.

Milton Valencia joined the lab of Sindhuja Sankaran, a Biological Systems Engineering researcher studying how sensor technology can aid plant breeding, crop research, and precision agriculture. “CGIAR Borlaug Fellowships are a starting point for international collaboration,” said Sankaran. “We’re learning from Milton, and he is learning from us.”

Prospective fellows are chosen for their research interests, achievements and potential, then recruited and matched with mentors by WSU’s Office of International Programs. Mentors later make a return visit to their fellow’s home country to help foster continuing discoveries. “Visiting fellows become part of the scientific community on campus,” said Colleen Taugher, Associate Director for Global Research & Engagement at WSU. “Through the CGIAR Fellowship program, we’ve brought some very promising scientists to WSU and are expecting strong outcomes.”

Read the Article : New global fellowship program grows discoveries, partnerships in ag research, 2019, CAHNRS News

 

 

 

 

 

Satellites and Drones Search for Better Wheat Varieties to Feed the World

May 29, 2019  |   WSU Insider

WSU researchers are using satellites and drones to search for better wheat varieties to feed a growing world. The team launched a new project this spring, developing techniques that allow satellites and drones to identify and study wheat varieties from overhead. This research is funded by a USDA-NIFA grant.

The team looks to speed up research toward identifying better, more productive wheat varieties.  If successful it will give growers powerful new tools to improve farming. Wheat currently feeds more than 1/3rd of the human population and is grown on more acres than any other crop. To meet the growing worldwide demand and stay ahead of pests, pathogens and a changing environment, wheat breeders strive to develop improved varieties. Phenotyping (measuring the way plant genes are expressed physically) allows selection of the best plants to breed for improved yield, grain quality and disease resistance. Machines can sense crop traits faster. With modern satellite imagery matched together with drones, visual and infrared imagery can be collected from wheat plots. Drone cameras can collect data with the hope that this matching process will enable identification of wheat varieties from orbit.

Part of the project’s challenge is to learn whether wheat varieties and their physical characteristics can be differentiated by their spectral data. “Sensors are getting better every day,” said team member Sindhuja Sankaran, an associate professor and sensor technology researcher at WSU’s Department of Biological Systems Engineering. “As resolution increases and camera costs drop, we have more powerful tools to sense how crops are performing.” Improved sensors will help to speed up the selection of new varieties, as well as help predict yields, monitor crop performance and protect plants from drought.

Read the Article : Images from space could help farmers grow better wheat varieties. WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

Artificial intelligence and precision farming: does efficiency mean sustainability?

May 28, 2019  |   filling-space.com

  • How does artificial intelligence-powered precision farming affect food sustainability?

This is a question that Filling Space.com asked their panel of experts, including Sindhuja Sankaran, an Agricultural Automation Engineering specialist from Washington State University’s Biological Systems Engineering Department.

Sankaran says, “For us, artificial intelligence serves as a key tool that assists in the application of sensor technology for phenotyping applications. Given the natural variability in plants, the thousands of crop varieties evaluated, and advancements in sensor technology (e.g. hyperspectral imaging system), it is impossible to identify patterns and evaluate plant traits without the application of artificial intelligence techniques… we use these methods to contribute to machine-guided informed selection of varieties, thus contributing to sustainability.”

Read the Article : Artificial intelligence and precision farming: does efficiency mean sustainability?, 2019, Filling-space.com

 

 

 

 

 

BSE Faculty and Students Attend ASABE 2018 – Student Wins First Place Award

BSE at ASABE 2018 August 1, 2018  |  Detroit, MI

Faculty and Graduate Students from Biological Systems Engineering attended the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) 2018 Annual Meeting. The event took place  July 29, 2018 – August 01, 2018 in Detroit Michigan.

BSE Faculty included Lav Khot, Troy Peters, Juming TangManoj Karkee, Sindhuja Sankaran, and Qin Zhang.

WSU alumnus Dr. Norman Scott was also in attendance.

 

More information about the meeting can be found on the ASABE Annual Meeting 2018 Website

 

 

Kapil Khanal with ASABE Award

In addition, BSE Master’s student Kapil Khanal (advised by BSE faculty member Dr. Manoj Karkee) won the first place Boyd-Scott Graduate Research Award for his research titled “Red Raspberry Bundling and Taping Mechanism.”

More information on the Boyd-Scott Graduate Research Award can be found on the ASABE Webiste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chongyuan Zhang receives 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence

April 19, 2018Chongyuan Zhang & Dr. Sindhuja Sankaran with award

Chongyuan Zhang, a Graduate Assistant in Sindhuja Sankaran’s group received the 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence at the 2018 WSU Graduate Student Evening of Excellence.

Congratulations to Chongyuan and Dr. Sankaran for this accomplishment!

More photos of the event can be found on the Event Photo Website