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CSANR, BSE researchers seek sites to grow tomorrow’s produce

Chad Kruger, director of CSANR; Claudio Stöckle, Biological Systems Engineering professor; and Kirti Rajagopalan, assistant research professor with CSANR,Thanks to a changing climate, production of fruits and vegetables may be more challenging in some regions of the country in the future.

To help ensure tomorrow’s fruits and vegetables, researchers with the WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources (CSANR) and Department of Biological Systems Engineering are on a four-year, $3.4 million research project to find more places to grow produce, led by the University of Florida.

At WSU, Chad Kruger, director of CSANR; Claudio Stöckle, Biological Systems Engineering professor; and Kirti Rajagopalan, assistant research professor with CSANR, received more than $490,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

“The fruit and vegetable industries make very significant investments in infrastructure and logistics to produce, process, pack and distribute products,” said Kruger. “Having better information to understand future risks to these investments is critical to the sustainability of fruit and vegetable production in the U.S.”

“The Pacific Northwest has growing advantages and opportunities that we want to explore,” added Rajagopalan. “We’re excited to help chart new strategies to sustain the fruit and vegetable value chain, while maintaining our nutritious, reliable and environmentally-sound food supply.”

Student Wins First Place

September 22, 2016

Congratulations to BSE, Tri-Cities student Hector Camargo! Hector won a Student Award at the 2016 International Society for Horticulture Science in Avignon, France.

He presented two papers, one poster, and one oral presentation. His poster titled: Modeling the growth of pollen tubes for Gala and Fuji Apples and his oral presentation: Predicting the Release of Endodormancy and Bud Break Occurrence for grapevines won 1st place in Hortimodel.

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Melba Ruth Salazar-Gutierrez

 

 

Cuts to Manure Gas Earns Student Kudos

George NeerackalPh.D. student, George Mathew Neerackal, won 2nd place at the Ron Sheffield Memorial Student Poster competition at the Waste to Worth conference, Seattle, WA; March 30-April 03, 2015.

Poster Title: Manure pH Management for Mitigating Ammonia Emissions from Manure Flush Dairy Barns

Advisor: Dr. Pius Ndegwa

Poster-HeaderGeorge
click to see full research poster

Dairy cows produce lots of manure. A WSU student’s research on cutting the environmental impact of all that waste won him second place in a poster competition at Seattle’s annual Waste to Worth conference.

George Neerackal, who graduates later this year with a doctorate in Biological Systems Engineering, took second in the Ron Sheffield Memorial Student poster contest, held March 31 to April 3.

[read full article from CAHNRS]

Warmest winter since 1992

March 2015 | by Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

markerstation1-300x222PROSSER, Wash. – The last time Prosser experienced a month as warm as February 2015, relative to normal, some people were still using typewriters and cordless telephones.

According to Washington State University’s AgWeatherNet, the February monthly anomaly was up 5.9 degrees overall and up 6.7 degrees for the mean monthly high.

[read full article]