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Let us bring demand into the equation

July 13, 2019  |   WSU Insider

Let us bring demand into the equationUntil recently, a climate-change induced shift in water supply was the story of the Columbia River Basin’s future. But as researchers continue to fine tune climate models, shifting demand for water now must be accounted for, say Washington State University scientists.

Because the region depends on snowpack accumulation in winter to supply spring and summer irrigation water, the climate warming-induced shift in precipitation type had researchers and resource managers worried. If there’s more rain and less snow, how will there be enough melt water to feed the irrigation system through the warm times of the year?

Supply and demand are accounted for in a recent paper by WSU assistant research professor Kirti Rajagopalan and colleagues.

 

 

Read the Article : Demand factored into Columbia River Basin’s future.  WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate Student wins Award in Soil and Water Management and Conservation

November 4, 2018  |  Pullman, WA

Moneim Mohamed, a PhD student in the Land, Air, Water Resources and Environmental Engineering (LAWREE) emphasis area of Biological Systems Engineering  has won the 2018 Graduate Student Award in the Soil and Water Management and Conservation (SAWMAC) Division. Moneim is advised by BSE faculty member Dr. R. Troy Peters.

 

For more information, please visit the Soils Across Latitudes Site.

Graduate Student Selected as Irrigation Foundation E3 Winner

October 15, 2018  |  Pullman, WA

Abdelmoneim Mohamed, a graduate student in the Land, Air, Water Resources & Environmental Engineering (LAWREE) emphasis area of Biological Systems Engineering has been selected as a Irrigation E3 winner by the Irrigation Foundation. Led by advisor, Dr. Troy Peters, Abdelmoneim will travel to the Irrigation Show and Education Conference which will take place December 3-7, 2018 in Long Beach, California.

More information can be found on the Irrigation Show and Education Conference’s Website.

 

BSE Faculty Receive USDA-NIFA Funding to Study Water Use

September 24, 2018  |  Pullman, WA

 

rotating irrigation system in fieldBiological Systems Engineering Faculty Claudio Stockle, Troy Peters, and Lav Khot received USDA-NIFA Funding as part of the State of the Washington Water Research Center (WRC) project titled “Technology for trade: new tools and new rules for water use efficiency in agriculture and beyond.

 

 

Read more about the project on the WSU News Story: Research to help water flow more freely to farms, fish, people and the Washington Water Research Center: Technology for trade: new tools and new rules for water use efficiency in agriculture and beyond.

 

Technology for Trade

September 24, 2018  |   WSU Insider

Research to help water flowNew technology and management approaches could help the West’s precious water flow more efficiently for farmers, residents and fish, thanks to pioneering work by scientists at Washington State University.

“Water is a valuable resource for everything from food production to drinking water, recreation and a healthy ecosystem,” said Jonathan Yoder, director of the State of Washington Water Research Center  and professor in School of Economic Sciences. “But water doesn’t always flow to its most important and valuable uses.”

Water is a challenging resource to manage for many reasons, including legal challenges for water rights, changing weather and uncertain supplies, difficulties in measuring consumption,  gauging its value and role in natural systems, and the costs and constraints of storing and moving it.

 

 

Read the Article : Research to help water flow more freely…  WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

BSE Faculty and Students Attend ASABE 2018 – Student Wins First Place Award

BSE at ASABE 2018 August 1, 2018  |  Detroit, MI

Faculty and Graduate Students from Biological Systems Engineering attended the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) 2018 Annual Meeting. The event took place  July 29, 2018 – August 01, 2018 in Detroit Michigan.

BSE Faculty included Lav Khot, Troy Peters, Juming TangManoj Karkee, Sindhuja Sankaran, and Qin Zhang.

WSU alumnus Dr. Norman Scott was also in attendance.

 

More information about the meeting can be found on the ASABE Annual Meeting 2018 Website

 

 

Kapil Khanal with ASABE Award

In addition, BSE Master’s student Kapil Khanal (advised by BSE faculty member Dr. Manoj Karkee) won the first place Boyd-Scott Graduate Research Award for his research titled “Red Raspberry Bundling and Taping Mechanism.”

More information on the Boyd-Scott Graduate Research Award can be found on the ASABE Webiste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chongyuan Zhang receives 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence

April 19, 2018Chongyuan Zhang & Dr. Sindhuja Sankaran with award

Chongyuan Zhang, a Graduate Assistant in Sindhuja Sankaran’s group received the 2018 Ann Chittenden Holland Master’s Thesis Award for Graduate Student Excellence at the 2018 WSU Graduate Student Evening of Excellence.

Congratulations to Chongyuan and Dr. Sankaran for this accomplishment!

More photos of the event can be found on the Event Photo Website

 

CSANR, BSE researchers seek sites to grow tomorrow’s produce

Chad Kruger, Claudio Stöckle, and Kirti Rajagopalan.Thanks to a changing climate, production of fruits and vegetables may be more challenging in some regions of the country in the future.

To help ensure tomorrow’s fruits and vegetables, researchers with the WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources (CSANR) and Department of Biological Systems Engineering are on a four-year, $3.4 million research project to find more places to grow produce, led by the University of Florida.

At WSU, Chad Kruger, director of CSANR; Claudio Stöckle, Biological Systems Engineering professor; and Kirti Rajagopalan, assistant research professor with CSANR, received more than $490,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

“The fruit and vegetable industries make very significant investments in infrastructure and logistics to produce, process, pack and distribute products,” said Kruger. “Having better information to understand future risks to these investments is critical to the sustainability of fruit and vegetable production in the U.S.”

“The Pacific Northwest has growing advantages and opportunities that we want to explore,” added Rajagopalan. “We’re excited to help chart new strategies to sustain the fruit and vegetable value chain, while maintaining our nutritious, reliable and environmentally-sound food supply.”

Washington State University