Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural Automation Engineering

Mark Schrader places in the ASABE Oral/Poster Competition at ASABE 2022

Mark Schrader presents

Jake Schrader ( PhD Student of Lav Khot, Agricultural Automation Engineering) is shown presenting in the ASABE Oral/Poster Competition during the ASABE Annual International Meeting in Houston, Texas, 2022.

Jake placed in the ASABE Oral/Poster Competition within the Machinery Systems technical community for his work entitled,“Thermal analysis of heated spray and implications for agricultural spray technologies”.

He will receive a $250 prize check for his presentation.

Sindhuja Sankaran honored by CAHNRS with early career excellence award

June 21, 2022  | CAHNRS News

Sindhuja SankaranEarly Career Excellence: Sindhuja Sankaran

An associate professor in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Sankaran studies sensor technologies for crop phenotyping and supports plant breeding, crop plant research, and precision agriculture applications. Her research and teaching program supports researchers from other CAHNRS departments and USDA-ARS labs.

Sankaran was honored for her leadership, service, and outreach, for a robust and productive research program, and as a terrific teacher who receives high marks on student evaluations. Highly engaged with her students and post-docs, she is an outstanding mentor for the next generation of scientists. Sankaran strives to impress upon them the importance of following rigorous scientific methods and of communication via prompt publication and involvement in scientific societies.

… continue reading CAHNRS News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drones and bird pests

June 1, 2022  |  WSU Insider

Automated drones could scare birds off agricultural fields

A Washington State University research team has developed a system for scaring birds, which they detail in a study published in the journal Computer and Electronics in Agriculture. The system is designed to have automated drones available 24 hours a day to scare pest birds, like European starlings or crows, that cost growers millions of dollars a year in lost fruit.

“Growers don’t really have a good tool they can rely on for deterring pest birds at an affordable price,” said Manoj Karkee, associate professor in WSU’s Department of Biological Systems Engineering and the study’s corresponding author. “With further refinement and industry partnerships, this system could work.”

For now, the birds are scared off just by the motion and whirring noises made by drones. But Karkee said that sounds, like distress calls or predatory bird noises, could be added. Builders could even design special drones for the job.

continue reading the article, WSU Insider, 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WSU Flower Thinning Robot

April 26, 2022  |  Wake Up Northwest on NBC Right Now.com

Manoj Karkee reports that WSU’s Agricultural Automation group of the Biological Systems Engineering Department has just begun testing their newest robot. The robot is aimed to produce a more stable and efficient pollination and thinning process. The Robotic Pollinator is built with a camera that can detect flower blossoms and determine which need to be pollinated or thinned. Students are currently trying to find the right stage to pollinate the fruit flowers. This comes from trial and error.

Dr. Karkee is trying to develop a robotic solution that would have a camera that works like human eyes to take pictures and works with a “brain”, a kind of artificial intelligence model running on a computer, that detects flowers, locates them and sends the signal to the controller of the robot. This signals the robot where to start thinning the flowers. Karkee thinks the method could also replace honeybees when the robot learns to pollinate flowers.

To view the rest of this news, click on the following link: NBC Right Now, KNDO23 / KNDU25   

 

 

 

 

 

Three Minute Thesis – Uddhav Bhattarai wins the CAHNRS PhD Competition

Uddhav Bhattarai has won the PhD CAHNRS 3 Minute Competition. He will compete at the WSU wide competition.

Congratulations Uddhav and Good Luck during the next phase!!

CAHNRS 2022 – 3 Minute thesis Results

 

 

PhD

  1. Uddhav Bhattarai – BSE – $1000 (Presentation Title: Robot Laborers for Apple Crop Management) – won tie-breaker and will advance to the University-level competition.
  2. Ramesh Sahni – BSE – $1000 (Presentation Title: Fixed spray system: Every drop to the drop)
  3. Sudha Upadhaya, Plant Path – $500 (Presentation Title: Can a picture save thousands of plants?)

Masters

  1. Em Rendleman, Entomology – $1,000 (Presentation Title:Experimental Varroa Mite Treatment in the European Honey Bee Apis Mellifera)
  2. Srijana Shrestha, Horticulture – $500 (Presentation Title: Professional Development Training for Soil-Biodegradable Plastic Mulch (BDM))
  3. Noah Willsea, Horticulture – $250 (Presentation Title: Retractable netting reduces sunburn risk while maintaining red color in apples)
  4. Jasmine Richman, Animal Sciences – $250 (Presentation Title: Investigating the activin receptor signaling pathway as a key regulator ofmuscle grown following whole genome duplication events)

 

Uddhav Bhattarai is a finalist for best oral presentation at ASABE 2021

July, 2021 | Pullman, WA

Uddhav Bhattarai placed in the ITSC community competition for the presentation titled “Simplifying Apple Flower/Fruit Counting: A Weakly Supervised Approach”.

Congratulations to all of the finalists of the ASABE Student Oral/Poster Presentation Competition, held during the 2021 Annual International Meeting.

Each finalist received a $250 prize check. For more information on the competition, please visit ASABE’s website: https://asabe.org/Poster.

 

 

 

Legacy of leadership and mentorship for retiring professor – Claudio Stockle

CAHNRS NEWS | December, 2021

“Claudio is one of those visionaries who was able to see the important role of computing in agriculture early on,” said Ananth Kalyanaraman, professor of computer science at the Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture and director of the new AgAID Institute. “His efforts will have a long-lasting impact on WSU’s research leadership in digital agriculture on the global stage.”

“In the future, agriculture is going to be a different beast, and we have to start preparing now,” said Stöckle, who intends to continue work with the grant as he enters a new chapter of his life.

“He is somebody who has built strong foundations in our program, grown our faculty numbers, and his influence goes beyond the borders of WSU,” said Manuel Garcia-Perez, professor and current chair of BSE.

Stöckle has served as a visiting professor at institutions in Italy, France, and Spain. Though he hails from Santiago, Chile, he and his wife call Pullman home.

“We haven’t found anywhere we like living better than right here in Pullman,” he said.

Read the Article : Legacy of leadership and mentorship for retiring professor, CAHNRS NEWS.

 

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

July 29, 2021 | WSU Insider

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

With a new $20 million federal grant, Washington State University will lead a multi-institutional research institute to develop artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to tackle some of agriculture’s biggest challenges related to labor, water, weather and climate change.

The new institute is one of 11 launched by the National Science Foundation and among two funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture in 2021. It’s called the AgAID Institute, which is short for USDA-NIFA Institute for Agricultural AI for Transforming Workforce and Decision Support.

WSU Insider

Members of Biological Systems Engineering who are involved in this work include:
Claudio Stockle
Qin Zhang
Lav Khot
Manoj Karkee
R. Troy Peters
Kirti Rajagopalan
Sindhuja Sankaran

Lav Khot named to 40 Under 40 Class of 2021

July 27, 2021 | CAHNRS News

Precision ag scientist Lav Khot named to Fruit + Vegetable 40 Under 40 Class.

 

Lav Khot, associate professor and precision agriculture scientist at Washington State University, was named to the Fruit + Vegetable 40 Under 40 Awards’ Class of 2021.

Created by Fruit Growers News, the awards honor outstanding leaders and thinkers who support the fruit industry. Representing every sector, from growers and farm marketers to researchers and suppliers, awardees are chosen by a panel of industry experts and celebrated annually during the Great Lakes Fruit, Vegetable & Farm Market Expo.

A WSU faculty member since 2013, Khot studies sensing and automation technologies to support fruit and berry crop production. His work helps growers better monitor and manage their crops using precision horticulture engineering technologies. These efforts help ensure optimal use of resources, such as chemicals, water, energy, and labor, as well as… to continue reading this CAHNRS News article, please press on this link.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WSU summer undergraduate research featured at virtual symposia

June 21, 2021  |  WSU Insider

WSU Summer undergrad research featured at virtual symposiaPhenomics Big Data Management group led by Sindhuja Sankaran

Washington State University will feature the mentored research of nearly 60 undergraduates from 36 universities at three virtual symposia on Friday, July 30, Aug. 3, and Aug. 6. Each event runs from 10:30 a.m.-noon each day. The public is invited to the no-cost presentations.

“The students may come from institutions across the nation plus WSU, but they shared a common experience by working with WSU’s outstanding faculty researchers and their teams on a variety of important projects.  “We look forward to hearing individual students explain the work they did and the results they found during their time at WSU.”

Sindhuja Sankaran’s lab, of the Agricultural Automation Engineering section of the Biological Systems Engineering Department, provides research experience for undergraduates on Phenomics Big Data Management. Crop phenomics is a new transdisciplinary field of research that is a critical interface between plant biology, engineering, and data sciences. Phenomics data refers to sensory data acquired from high-throughput sensing/automation equipment that are associated with crop phenotypes/traits. Crop phenotyping is a complex process as the plant phenotype results from interactions between the genetic framework, dynamically changing environment, and complex plant physiology.

Student projects this Friday will be from the Sankaran, Padowski, and Offerdahl labs. A schedule posted on the summer undergraduate research website details the names of student researchers and their presentation times.

… continue reading the article, WSU Insider, 2021.