Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University
Biological Systems Engineering News: Rajagopalan

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

July 29, 2021 | WSU Insider

WSU to lead national AI research institute for agriculture

With a new $20 million federal grant, Washington State University will lead a multi-institutional research institute to develop artificial intelligence (AI) solutions to tackle some of agriculture’s biggest challenges related to labor, water, weather and climate change.

The new institute is one of 11 launched by the National Science Foundation and among two funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture in 2021. It’s called the AgAID Institute, which is short for USDA-NIFA Institute for Agricultural AI for Transforming Workforce and Decision Support.

WSU Insider

Members of Biological Systems Engineering who are involved in this work include:
Claudio Stockle
Qin Zhang
Lav Khot
Manoj Karkee
R. Troy Peters
Kirti Rajagopalan
Sindhuja Sankaran

Let us bring demand into the equation

July 13, 2019  |   WSU Insider

Let us bring demand into the equationUntil recently, a climate-change induced shift in water supply was the story of the Columbia River Basin’s future. But as researchers continue to fine tune climate models, shifting demand for water now must be accounted for, say Washington State University scientists.

Because the region depends on snowpack accumulation in winter to supply spring and summer irrigation water, the climate warming-induced shift in precipitation type had researchers and resource managers worried. If there’s more rain and less snow, how will there be enough melt water to feed the irrigation system through the warm times of the year?

Supply and demand are accounted for in a recent paper by WSU assistant research professor Kirti Rajagopalan and colleagues.

 

 

Read the Article : Demand factored into Columbia River Basin’s future.  WSU Insider

 

 

 

 

 

Technology for Trade

September 24, 2018  |   WSU Insider

Research to help water flowNew technology and management approaches could help the West’s precious water flow more efficiently for farmers, residents and fish, thanks to pioneering work by scientists at Washington State University.

“Water is a valuable resource for everything from food production to drinking water, recreation and a healthy ecosystem,” said Jonathan Yoder, director of the State of Washington Water Research Center  and professor in School of Economic Sciences. “But water doesn’t always flow to its most important and valuable uses.”

Water is a challenging resource to manage for many reasons, including legal challenges for water rights, changing weather and uncertain supplies, difficulties in measuring consumption,  gauging its value and role in natural systems, and the costs and constraints of storing and moving it.

 

 

Read the Article : Research to help water flow more freely…  WSU Insider